Managing Software Debt 2015 Predictions

2015 is fast approaching and for the first time I felt the urge to make public predictions on what the new year will bring through the lens of Managing Software Debt. Interestingly enough, many of these predictions revolve around topics this blog was constructed to discuss. This blog has been a long time coming for me since my last official blog post prior to November was in 2012 so let me take a slight diversion to describe my reflections on how this blog came into being.

My last blog gettingagile.com had run its course after 178 posts from 2005 to 2012 and it seemed to me that we were Beyond Agile and I needed a different focus. After publishing Managing Software Debt: Building for Inevitable Change in 2010, a reference on 5 types of software debt and how they can be managed and monitored, it seemed that focusing on leading change through Continuous Delivery and reducing Configuration Management Debt had the best results in my consulting experience. Since that time, the DevOps movement has hit a full stride and embodies this approach for leading change in organizations. I think we are on the precipice of our next industry revolution to reduce the cost of change for software as cloud has become a common enterprise platform of choice. With that, here are areas of the software development, deployment and operations ecosystem that I think are going to see significant interest in 2015.

  • PaaS (Platform as a Service)
  • Twelve-Factor Apps and Microservices
  • Feature Teams around Business Capabilities
  • Deployment Orchestration

PaaS

OK, OK. I know that my new role is Product Owner for PaaS at CenturyLink Cloud but there is a good reason I took this role in November (time to note my disclaimer that the views expressed on this blog are mine alone). In my last few roles the impact of infrastructure development enabling deployment foo applications and services to cloud platforms was significant enough to cause me pause. It seemed that the problems being solved were similar across development efforts: load balancing apps & services, event publishing & processing, service discovery, continuous delivery pipelining, blue/green deployments and infrastructure provisioning just to name a few. We had looked at multiple vendor offerings but what we saw prior to 2014 had been, in our opinion, immature. As 2014 progressed, the popularity of containers kicked off a valuable conversation about separation of concerns for deployment and infrastructure. Containers provided a piece of the solution that allowed infrastructure and application/service development to execute within their own life cycles beyond what Puppet and Chef had done for configuration management.

After I heard about the Product Owner role here at CenturyLink Cloud, where I’d be working with a team to deliver PaaS based on Cloud Foundry, I updated my knowledge of the PaaS space. I had already been playing with Docker and worked with others who implemented a build pipeline for our services based on Docker containers. Through this process it was clear that there were still significant problems to solve beyond the ease of development story that Docker was just an introductory chapter to. While researching Cloud Foundry again, after trying it out back in 2012 and deciding not to use it, I was pleasantly surprised how far the platform had come. Immediately I took notice of an aspect of Cloud Foundry called Warden which manages isolated, ephemeral, and resource-controlled environments (aka containers). It been around since November 2011 and had the full Cloud Foundry ecosystem surrounding it which looked to help solve more of the problems in the infrastructure and application/service deployment space than other alternatives available today.

As more enterprise developers see the benefits of PaaS, such as ease of development and deployment with low overhead for configuration management and operations involvement, there will be a large upswing in its adoption. Also, folks in operations will further benefit and enable the DevOps culture as PaaS continues to mature allowing for more self-service provisioning and deployment while still getting the visibility needed to support service level agreements and control operating costs. Look for more on PaaS in this blog as we learn more about how customers innovate and deliver on our upcoming PaaS offering.

Twelve-Factor Apps and Microservices

My last post on The Imminent Acceleration of the Twelve-Factor Apps Approach already discussed why I think The Twelve-Factor App and Microservices will be big in 2015. Some folks in our industry are already realizing the benefits of these approaches. It is probably not surprising that this realization was found mostly outside of the monolithic ESB and SOA tool vendor offerings. Instead, the rise of SPAs (single page apps), RESTful APIs, OpenID/OAuth, cloud computing, open source and many other emergent approaches from the community have been the potion for increased adoption of service-oriented architectures. Look for significant changes in enterprise application development to support The Twelve-Factor Apps approach and implementation of Microservices (or at least less monolithic) as 2015 progresses.

Feature Teams around Business Capabilities

As the chapter “Platform Experience Debt” from the Managing Software Debt book explained, organizations are more flexible when there is clearer alignment of teams to business capabilities and ultimately to their users. The rise of DevOps has brought the cultural changes needed to be more adaptive (and dare I say “agile”) to light and ignited a follow on movement from the software development centric agile movement to incorporating production operations as an aspect of team responsibility. This has made it even more apparent that the Feature Teams collaborative team configuration helps drive alignment of business capabilities with user needs along. Not only that, this organizational alignment creates less brittle boundaries between teams than component (or functional) team configurations do. DevOps has definitely made its mark with Gene Kim’s book The Phoenix Project and the outbreak of DevOps oriented conferences around the world. Look for the DevOps movement to accelerate as more real world change stories are shared in the new year.

Deployment Orchestration

With the rise of PaaS, The Twelve-Factor App and Microservices, the need for more effective deployment orchestration tools and processes will grow. Enterprise Operations groups will need strategies for dealing with the increased frequency of deployment, proliferation of environments and running processes, and hybrid models with internal data centers and cloud architectures used in conjunction with public cloud provider offerings. Continuous Integration servers and access to server instances are not enough. The number of deployment models, platforms, and network topologies will make governance a mess. In 2015 we will need to start finding solutions to orchestrating deployments from build to validation to deployment and to governance. There is a lot of room to innovate and make a significant impact in Deployment Orchestration. I’m excited to see what is coming to solve Deployment Orchestration challenges in the new year.

This is my first attempt at a predictions blog. Let me know how I did on Twitter (@csterwa). I’m always looking for feedback.

Have a Happy New Year 2015!

Published by

Chris Sterling

Chris Sterling is Global Director of DevOps and Cloud Practices at Luxoft (www.luxoft.com), a 10,000+ person, $2B global technology solution provider with approximately 200 employees in the Pacific Northwest. Chris has an extensive technology, product management, process, and consulting background. Chris published the book Managing Software Debt: Building for Inevitable Change with Addison-Wesley in 2010 to provide a framework for teams and organizations to assess and manage debt in their software systems. Chris was a Certified Scrum Trainer with the Scrum Alliance for 8 years and taught thousands of people about how to apply Scrum effectively. Chris has successfully supported organizational transformation across multiple verticals with organizations of 10 up to 800 people. Chris co-founded a company in 2009 called Agile Advantage focused on solving portfolio management problems to leverage the value that Agile teams can deliver, which lead to a successful acquisition by Rally Software. He has spoken at many conferences and user groups on topics such as continuous delivery, software architecture, technology management, Lean and Agile processes, and Lean Startup. Chris has taught the “Advanced Topics in Agile Software Development” class at the University of Washington in the Agile Developer Certificate extension program. Chris brings his diverse experience and deep passion for technology when discussing topics such as Continuous Delivery, Cloud Native architecture, DevOps, Lean and Agile. Follow me @csterwa or get LinkedIn with me at http://linkedin.com/in/chrissterling.